News


08
November 2018

CHSH and Ecker & Partner invited guests to attend "Rise & Shine. The New Culture of Failure."

 

 

Numerous guests from leading Austrian and international companies accepted an invitation to attend yesterday's event "Rise & Shine. The New Culture of Failure", which was held on Wednesday 7 November 2018 in the conference rooms of Cerha Hempel Spiegelfeld Hlawati and co-organised by the law firm and Viennese PR agency Ecker & Partner.

The annual series of restructuring events organised by CHSH this year examined the question of whether past failures enable a person to do more for a company's future – i.e. whether failure makes us better. This should be seen in light of current trends and headlines, such as the Silicon Valley mantra "Fail fast. Fail often", and general economic change attributed to innovations and new technologies and services.

Damian Izdebski, founder and managing director of erstwhile IT service provider Ditech, now founder and managing director of techbold, gave the keynote speech on this subject. Afterwards, Claudia Witzemann, Managing Director of weXelerate, Claudia Oeking, Head of Corporate Affairs at Philip Morris Austria, Thomas Trettnak, Partner at CHSH and of course Damian Izdebski took part in a discussion moderated by Nicole Bäck-Knapp, Managing Partner at Ecker & Partner.

Thomas Trettnak: "The problems that companies face in our hi-tech age have basically remained the same as those faced by businesses during the years of rapid industrial expansion at the beginning of the 20th century. However, the stigma attached to commercial failure is more and more becoming a thing of the past – and that's a good thing."

Nicole Bäck-Knapp: "'Storytelling' is one of the key issues in the communications industry – fundamentally, it simply means telling a 'good story'. From ancient times right up to the modern Hollywood era, such tales tell the story of a crisis which must be overcome. Thus, stories about restructurings and fascinating business-related stories also have enormous potential for the communications sector."